Pia Wüstenberg

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Pia Wüstenberg is well known for her mixed-material Stacking Vessels, combining blown glass, ceramic, turned wood and metal. They come in lots of different variations, all with wonderful bloated forms and are a brilliant exercise in mixing different craft skills.
Pia recently introduced a new evolution of the Stacking Vessel called Branch Bowls, which pairs a hand-blown glass bowl with a lid formed from a tree branch. There is a great video filmed by James Maiki called A Tale of Two Halves which gives a glimpse into how they are made.  The film shows the mesmerising process of the two separate pieces being made and fitted together and highlights the craftsmanship that goes into making the work. I thoroughly enjoyed watching the video, although I confess that I love glass blowing and could happily watch it all day.
I interviewed Pia for a book project recently and thought I would include some extracts from the interview here. We were discussing her work and inspirations…

How did you get involved in design?
I studied a Foundation in Glass, Metal and Ceramic Design at SIAD in Farnham and a BA in Furniture Design and Craftsmanship at Bucks New University. I chose Furniture Design as I believe it is a versatile product requiring the most technical and material knowledge. Later I studied in London on the MA Design Products course at the Royal College of Arts. I set up my own studio following graduation.
How would you describe your style?
It is all about contrast. Everything I do is mixed-media, and the process and materiality of each media supports the other. All my work is handmade. I use traditional craft skills and traditional raw materials, such as wood, ceramic, glass and paper. The resulting objects contain the stories of their making and the traces of the materials origin. This makes them objects of desire.
What materials and techniques do you use?
I work with very raw and pure materials such as glass, ceramic, copper, wood and paper. These are processed using traditional craft techniques.
Are there any particular designer/artists/things that inspire you?
I really respect the work and philosophy of Kaj Franck and Jurgen Bey. I get inspiration from many things I see, it just depends on the mind frame I am in.
What are you working on at the moment and what do you hope to work on in the future?
At the moment, I am working on a collection of glass jewellery to hold scent. In the future, I hope to work more with glass, to challenge its application and the ways in which we normally find it used.
Have you noticed any particular trends in design lately?
I have noticed my friends investing in objects for life, rather than going for cheap, quick solutions.
What materials or techniques do you think we’ll be seeing more of in the future?
I believe there will be a return to pure materials and traditional skills. Mainly because I think we want fewer things, and for the things we do want , we have to be considered and durable.
What is your favourite piece of design by another designer?
The sewing needle, paperclip, can opener, fork and scissors. There are so many simple, clever things that do not have a shining name or famous designer behind them, and they are the most durable designs that we live with. These are the designs that move something in me, that challenge me to think, innovate and feel desire for objects.

Thank you Pia!
www.utopiaandutility.eu

Shibori

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I’m not sure when it became proper practice to refer to hippie tie dye as the rather more fancy sounding shibori, but that I will do. In truth, I think there is a subtle difference; 60’s-inspired tie dye tends to be quicker with more immediate and colourful results, whereas shibori is controlled, and looks directly to intricate (and ancient) Japanese binding, stitching and folding techniques. Shibori is often dyed using natural indigo – but by no means always – and the boundaries between the two techniques are definitely faint and blurry!
These photographs are from a shibori workshop I went to in the summer, led by textile artist Janice Gunner at the beautiful Cowslip Workshops in Launceston, Cornwall. Cowslip is based in several converted barns on a dairy farm, so while you are at work, you can hear the cows mooing and enjoy the view across bright green fields.
I spent two days making samples and trying out different techniques. First stitching, twisting and tying the cloth to create various resist patterns, before immersing the fabrics in buckets of deep indigo and lighter woad. When the indigo-dyed fabric is exposed to air, it is transformed from iridescent scarab beetle green to that perfect shade of deep, deep blue. It is almost a magical process and the reason many people get hooked on blues.

DIY Colour Recipe Book

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Laura Daza is a colourist who transforms raw materials into pigment. In her project Colour Provenance, she explores the ancient origins of colour, looking at both how it was sourced, crafted and utilised, and how different colours, shades and tints have the power to affect mood and emotion.
Laura has recently released a beautiful book based on her findings from the project. Called the DIY Colour Recipe Book, it features a palette of eight ancient colours: whiteshell, saffron, ochre, verdigris, malachite, azurite, mummy brown and lamp black, and explains how to make them. Laura shares her personal methods, secrets and experiences in creating the colours, and describes processes such as making green from malachite, considered to be the first green ever used, or white from ground ostrich eggshells, a technique commonly used by Egyptians.
The science of colour is a fascinating subject and this book would be an inspiring guide to anyone who wants to understand and appreciate the origin of everyday colour in a hands-on and authentic way.

Photography: KKgas

Clay Hunting

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The scenic landscape here in North Cornwall is wild, rugged and untamed. Dig beneath the surface and you’ll also find that it contains rich seams of natural materials; tin, granite, sandstone, slate and clay, each one as useful as they are beautiful.
All good cooks know that a dish is only as good as the ingredients used, and the same goes for woodwork, sewing, weaving and almost any other making activity. It’s certainly true of pottery, which is what led me to visit this working clay quarry nearby.
Situated on the seaward side of a granite uprising, the quarry is home to two unique raw materials, one a high quality silica sand and the other a much revered clay deposit favoured by many world renowned potters. It was great to be able to visit this small family owned business in person. The backdrop of the wild Atlantic coast and fields full of brassicas made for a beautiful setting, where I saw clay being prepared using simple methods, with materials dug directly from the pits.
The clay available varies in shade from milky white through buff, to toasty brown and coal black. Naturally I picked up a few samples, and now begins the journey of transforming it from muddy earth into strong and functional pots.